Akamai Diversity

The Akamai Blog

Life Lessons at NAB

Less than a year out of college and getting ready to cover my first NAB Show as a wet-behind-the-ears trade journalist in the mid 90s, I remember receiving a fascinating (especially at the time) piece of advice. It came from a veteran of many shows, not to mention many trips to Las Vegas, shortly after I was assigned an ambitious list of conference sessions to report on during the week.

3 Recommendations for a Successful Social Media Strategy

The highly regulated environment of the financial services industry has likely contributed to the fact that many banks and financial institutions have been relatively slow to embrace social media engagement. However, with a deep understanding of the landscape and the compliance issues that govern the industry, financial institutions can have great success within the social media landscape.

Play Games Like a Player

Do you remember what it was like to play a game? Not as a games industry insider, studying a competitor's game, or keenly critiquing your own work. Just playing a game because it was fun, and because you had nothing at stake, and because there was a ninja on the box.

Securing the future of mobile video

By Lu Bolden, Vice President, Business Development, Verimatrix

The coming of age for mobile video and TV was perhaps one of the most tangible takeaways from the recent Mobile World Congress (MWC) at Barcelona, amid some of the more futuristic demonstrations around say the Internet of Things and virtual reality. 

On Trust and Video Games

I was about to hop on the Caltrain to San Francisco when I got the call. Over the metal on metal screech of the locomotive pulling into the station I could only make out the last few words, "to verify a few recent transactions". After boarding the train, I stood in the vestibule whispering for 20 minutes. It was my bank. Someone had gotten access to my debit card information and was making purchases in a country I'd never visited.

In this article we'll review how to handle known bot traffic.

As discussed in the first part, you may not be comfortable serving content to all legitimate bots for various reasons. But even when you're willing to serve content to known bots, several options are available. Just like for unknown bots, you'll have to decide on the response strategy that works best for you.

With the release of the Fourth Quarter, 2015 State of the Internet Report, we've also made a small but important update to the associated data visualization tools on www.stateoftheinternet.com.

While the report itself generally covers either the top ten countries or states, or a selected set of countries/regions, we often get requests for full data sets.  Researchers, journalists, folks involved in broadband initiatives, and others have asked for data on all 50 states, or the full complement of countries in a given region, either for the current quarter, or going back several years.

In part 1 of this series we've discussed the difficult problem of differentiating the good vs. the bad. In this article we'll review how to go about defining a response strategy to manage bots that you think are bad for your business. First thing you'll have to decide is whether you want to serve any content at all to these bots. We recommend you do to keep the bot at bay but of course it depends on your context and what infrastructure you have available.

Eight years ago, Akamai CMO Brad Rinklin called me into his office to talk about an idea he had - sharing some of Akamai's unique Internet insights with the broader community and establishing thought leadership along the way.  (I even have the PowerPoint deck around somewhere, although it's buried in 17 years of Aka-files and Aka-mail.)  Out of that conversation came the State of the Internet Report - we published the first issue in May 2008, covering the first quarter of 2008.  The report itself covered security (attack traffic, DDoS attacks, and publicized Web site hacks), networks (outages, de-peering events, routing issues, and significant new connectivity), Internet penetration (unique IPv4 addresses seen by Akamai and unique IP addresses per capita), and broadband (% above 5 Mbps, % above 2 Mbps, and % below 256 kbps).

As you may have heard, Akamai recently introduced a new product, Bot Manager. I've been working at Akamai for close to 10 years and, in my past roles here (Technical Support Engineer, Enterprise Architect), I've had the opportunity to work closely with many customers who had issues with bots. Generally, this was about protecting the site against "bad bots" but also making sure that "good bots" were not impacted by any of the mitigation techniques.