Akamai Diversity

The Akamai Blog

In this article we'll review how to handle known bot traffic.

As discussed in the first part, you may not be comfortable serving content to all legitimate bots for various reasons. But even when you're willing to serve content to known bots, several options are available. Just like for unknown bots, you'll have to decide on the response strategy that works best for you.

With the release of the Fourth Quarter, 2015 State of the Internet Report, we've also made a small but important update to the associated data visualization tools on www.stateoftheinternet.com.

While the report itself generally covers either the top ten countries or states, or a selected set of countries/regions, we often get requests for full data sets.  Researchers, journalists, folks involved in broadband initiatives, and others have asked for data on all 50 states, or the full complement of countries in a given region, either for the current quarter, or going back several years.

In part 1 of this series we've discussed the difficult problem of differentiating the good vs. the bad. In this article we'll review how to go about defining a response strategy to manage bots that you think are bad for your business. First thing you'll have to decide is whether you want to serve any content at all to these bots. We recommend you do to keep the bot at bay but of course it depends on your context and what infrastructure you have available.

Eight years ago, Akamai CMO Brad Rinklin called me into his office to talk about an idea he had - sharing some of Akamai's unique Internet insights with the broader community and establishing thought leadership along the way.  (I even have the PowerPoint deck around somewhere, although it's buried in 17 years of Aka-files and Aka-mail.)  Out of that conversation came the State of the Internet Report - we published the first issue in May 2008, covering the first quarter of 2008.  The report itself covered security (attack traffic, DDoS attacks, and publicized Web site hacks), networks (outages, de-peering events, routing issues, and significant new connectivity), Internet penetration (unique IPv4 addresses seen by Akamai and unique IP addresses per capita), and broadband (% above 5 Mbps, % above 2 Mbps, and % below 256 kbps).

As you may have heard, Akamai recently introduced a new product, Bot Manager. I've been working at Akamai for close to 10 years and, in my past roles here (Technical Support Engineer, Enterprise Architect), I've had the opportunity to work closely with many customers who had issues with bots. Generally, this was about protecting the site against "bad bots" but also making sure that "good bots" were not impacted by any of the mitigation techniques. 

Hackers vs. Media

We're used to hearing about cyber attacks against financial institutions and retailers. But another industry faces a growing threat: Media.

Digital media publishers strive to provide meaningful content and a user experience that will grow a dedicated base of content consumers. This allows the publisher to partner with and provide services to marketing and advertising concerns to build cash flow that can be used to further enhance the experience for content consumers.

4 Critical Focus Areas

During a recent business trip, I had the opportunity to finally see Adam McKay's wonderful portrayal of the horror that was the 2008 financial crisis - "The Big Short." Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling and Steve Carell brought me right back to that time, not so long ago, when we all witnessed the fall of major Wall Street firms and the destruction caused by the sub-prime mortgage boom.

GDC is here, and Akamai is... there.

Now is the time to stop by the Akamai booth at GDC. We've got an interactive demo that will surprise you. We've also got several games experts at the booth who can discuss what we've done to help some of the biggest games on the planet.

The Akamai Media team is hard at work putting together a completely new experience for you at NAB this year - you'll actually be able to walk through an OTT workflow and see firsthand what Akamai is doing to help you get your content and media files online faster, for delivery to bigger audiences at the highest quality. Stay tuned for more exciting details as the show approaches.

One of the important, and more interesting, use cases of Network Function Virtualization (NFV) and Software Defined Networking (SDN) is CORD.

CORD stands for Central Office Re-architected as Datacenter.  It "combines NFV, SDN, and the elasticity of commodity clouds to bring datacenter economics and cloud agility to the Telco Central Office" according to the CORD website.  It is an initiative that was started by AT&T and Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) almost two years ago now.