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Recently by Will Law

Will Law

Will Law

October 10, 2018 5:00 AM

Best Practices for Ultra-Low Latency Streaming Using ...

Over the last 15 years, live streaming services have grown from novelties & experiments in to profitable businesses serving an ever-growing cohort of cord-cutters and cord-nevers. Initial streaming implementations mimicked the workflows of the broadcast world, using custom servers to deliver streams via proprietary protocols. Here at Akamai traffic grew 22,000-fold from a 1 Gbps stream in 2001 (the first Victoria's Secret webcast) to 23 Tbps in June 2018 for

Will Law

Will Law

June 20, 2016 10:04 AM

CMAF: What It Is and Why It May Change Your OTT Futu ...

By Will Law and Shawn Michels Apple's June 15th announcement at its Worldwide Developers Conference that it will add fragmented MP4 (fMP4) support to HLS marks a significant step in simplifying online video streaming. fMP4 is the parent of the emerging Common Media Application Format (CMAF), and Apple's plan to support fMP4 brings the industry closer to the single format for OTT distributors and playback support on all consumer electronics

Will Law

Will Law

January 28, 2016 1:43 PM

Akamai Optimizes Nokia Technologies OZO VR Experienc ...

By Nelson Chao and Will Law Overview: On November 30 in Los Angeles, Nokia Technologies held a launch event to announce the availability of the OZO, a first-of-its kind 3D 360-degree virtual reality (VR) camera, which is defining a new category in professional VR capture. To demonstrate the camera's capabilities, Nokia Technologies partnered with Akamai to deliver a live stream using the Akamai Network. Nokia Technologies used an OZO to

Will Law

Will Law

April 17, 2012 8:09 PM

DASHing Into an Era of Convergence

San Francisco has a largely unknown place in the history of television. Back in 1927, on Green Street in the city, Philo Farnsworth had patented a method for showing moving pictures wirelessly. As a lone inventor, he was up against RCA, Westinghouse and Marconi. Each TV broadcaster at the time required a custom TV set to receive their signals. If you wanted to watch certain channels, you had to buy