Akamai Diversity
Home > David Belson

Recently by David Belson

Refining the State of the Internet Report


Over the last several years, many users have adopted mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets, as their primary means of accessing the Internet. A number of studies published over the past year illustrate this trend, especially among millennials. In addition, improvements to, and greater deployment of this technology by mobile network providers have led to mobile connection speeds that rival fixed broadband connections in some geographies.  LTE-Advanced, which is being rolled out by carriers in countries around the world, provides for download speeds in the hundreds of Mbps range, with the latest Android and Apple devices including support for LTE-Advanced.

If you are a long-time reader of the State of the Internet Report, you are like familiar with the terms “Broadband”, “High Broadband”, and “4K Ready” as they have historically been used in the report. (For specific definitions, see the blog post at http://akamai.me/sotimetrics) When you read the First Quarter, 2015 State of the Internet Report, you’ll see that we’ve phased out the usage of these terms in favor of speed-specific references.

The Q4 2014 State of the Internet Report will be available for download on March 25. In the meantime, here are some of the highlights from the report.

Security
Across the fourth quarter, Akamai observed attack traffic originating from nearly 200 unique countries/regions. Of these, China and the United States remained the top two sources. Port 23 remained the most targeted port for attacks during the fourth quarter -- continuing the trend of the previous two quarters. Additionally, Akamai recorded a rise in DDoS attacks.

State of the Internet Metrics: What Do They Mean?

Nearly two years ago, we published the blog post "Clarifying State of the Internet Report Metrics," which served as a great reference for those interested in finding out more about the metrics published within the State of the Internet Report. Since the report has evolved, we're releasing an update to clarify existing metrics and review new ones, with the goal of minimizing confusion about terms and data in the report.


Update on IPv6 Adoption

In the third quarter of 2013, the State of the Internet Report started to include insight into IPv6 adoption based on data gathered from across the Akamai Intelligent Platform™. Throughout the last year, we've seen impressive growth rates across the top countries and network providers on both a quarterly and yearly basis as native IPv6 connectivity is made available to more end users.

Although our goal was to publish it in mid-December, unexpectedly busy schedules and holiday time off derailed those plans. Fear not, though, as the Q3 2014 State of the Internet Report will be published just after the start of the New Year. As a belated holiday present for our readers, we will also be launching an updated connectivity visualization on the State of the Internet website, a new State of the Internet subspace on the Akamai Community, and an updated mobile application for iOS devices.

Although our goal was to publish it in mid-December, unexpectedly busy schedules and holiday time off derailed those plans. Fear not, though, as the Third Quarter, 2014 State of the Internet Report will be published just after the start of the New Year. As a belated holiday present for our readers, we will also be launching an updated connectivity visualization on the State of the Internet Web site, a new State of the Internet subspace on the Akamai Community, and an updated mobile application for iOS devices.

Historical Lookback: Observed Attack Traffic

The previous two blog posts in this series reviewed how key connectivity metrics have trended over the last six years and trends in IPv6 adoption/IPv4 exhaustion.  Unfortunately, as connectivity has improved over the years, attacks on Internet infrastructure have become more commonplace.  This includes targeted DDoS attacks, application layer attacks, brute force login attempts, and attempted exploitation of known vulnerabilities (both new and those patched long ago). In today's post, we'll review observed attack traffic trends seen across a number of countries over the last six years. (While the choice of countries in the graphs below may seem a bit arbitrary, they are drawn from a data set initially aggregated at the request of the OECD a few years back.)
Yesterday's blog post reviewed how key connectivity metrics have trended over the last six years.  In general, average and peak connection speeds, as well as high broadband and broadband adoption, have all grown over time, although the growth rates in some regions have clearly been more aggressive than in other regions.  However, without IPv4, none of that connectivity would have been possible.  Going forward, IPv6 will be a key enabler of connectivity as available IPv4 address space is exhausted.  In today's post, we'll review IPv6 traffic trends seen on the Akamai Intelligent Platform during 2013, as well as global IPv4 exhaustion trends seen during 2012-2013.

Historical Lookback: Connectivity Trends

Over the last few years, we have included a "Historical Lookback" section at the end of the 4th Quarter issues of the State of the Internet Report. The section has generally included data aggregated at a continental level (where appropriate), with graphs showing how particular metrics have trended over time.  This year, we are publishing the the historical lookback content as a series of blog posts, including interactive graphs that can be zoomed, customized, and saved.  Today's post will cover connectivity trends, including connection speeds and broadband adoption from 2008-2013, while posts over the next two days will cover trends in IPv6 Traffic and IPv4 Exhaustion, as well as Observed Attack Traffic.  (And don't forget that you can download the full 4th Quarter report, or any of the prior issues, from http://www.akamai.com/stateoftheinternet, or read them in the State of the Internet iOS app.)
1 2 3