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In June 2012, Akamai launched the "Akamai IO" data visualization tool, with an initial data set that highlighted browser usage across PCs and other connected devices connecting to Akamai via fixed and mobile networks. The data used for Akamai IO is sampled from nearly three trillion requests for content that Akamai handles each day.  It also makes use of Akamai's EdgeScape IP address geolocation tool to help identify IP addresses belonging to mobile/cellular network providers, which allows us to break out connections from those providers separately within the visualization tool. While we feature data from Akamai IO in each quarter's State of the Internet Report, we thought it would be interesting to look at longer term trending for mobile browser usage as part of the MobilePerf blog series.

One of the most frustrating experiences online is waiting for a page to load, or trying to complete a transaction for that 'must have' item, and being greeted with an unresponsive screen.  In fact, Akamai's 2015 Performance Matters report found that 49% of consumers expect a page to load in two seconds or less. As consumers' expectations for page load-speed increases, their patience for slow-loading websites decreases. Currently, only 51% of consumers "wait patiently" for a website to load, compared to 63% five years ago.

I am excited to attend American Banker's new conference, Cybersec 2016 in NYC on July 19. This is a new conference for American Banker and it is bringing together some great speakers from USAA, Bank of the West, BBVA and many other innovative financial institutions. I am particularly looking forward to hearing Frank Abagnale speak - I really enjoyed his book "Catch Me if You Can"!

Are bots muddying your marketing analytics?

In short, most likely.

Bots have become a hot topic with many retailers lately as security has become a higher priority. Malicious bots can be part of a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack or efforts to extract valuable customer data, or both.

With this issue, the start of the ninth volume of the State of the Internet Report, we are introducing several changes, with several more planned to follow in subsequent issues.

The first notable change is within the regional breakout sections of the report. For the last several years, the report has included a "Geography: Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA)" section, surveying a selected set of countries within those regions. Starting this quarter, we've broken that section apart, and the report will now include a "Geography: Europe" section, which includes all 28 member countries of the European Union plus three more non-members that have long been included within the EMEA section. The report will also now include a "Geography: Middle East and Africa (MEA)" section that surveys 13 countries from across that extended region. Given the increasing role the Internet is playing across multiple facets of life in this developing region and the ongoing improvements to both domestic and international Internet connectivity within these countries, we felt it was time to break out connection speeds and broadband adoption rates for Middle East and Africa countries into a distinct section, where surveyed countries can be compared with their local peers.

Green is the Warmest Color

Recently, Akamai announced the company's plans to expand its sustainability initiatives through an innovative renewable energy procurement strategy. Unlike many of its peers in the tech industry, Akamai does not operate its own data centers. That means, for example, we don't have roofs on which to install solar panels, which is one key way of generating your own renewable power.

HTTP/2 Performance Monitoring

This blog post is part of an ongoing series where we discuss a wide range of topics related to HTTP/2 (h2). In today's post, I explore why TTFB (Time to First Byte) may not be the best measure of h2 performance. I also address questions regarding why TTFB may be higher for h2, and why that's not necessarily a bad thing.

I was on a flight to Brazil last night to kick off a week of meetings with partners and customers in Latin America. During the eight-and-a-half-hour flight from Atlanta, I got an opportunity to watch a few movies I've been meaning to catch up on, and on the top of the list was Steve Jobs. There's a scene near the end of the movie where Steve is trying to recruit John Sculley, the CEO of Pepsi, to join Apple as their new CEO. Steve Jobs' winning pitch was that his vision for the Macintosh will be the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.

In my last blog when I kicked off our MobilePerf Blog Series, I talked about mobile Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Google's guidance on how to make your sites mobile friendly. 

Google just announced that they will also factor in your mobile site's page speed when ranking your organization in the mobile friendly search results. 

Recently, Dan Shugrue, one of our product marketing directors at Akamai was published in InfoSecurity magazine. His article, Barbarians at the Gate - Shoring Up Web Application Defenses with Client Reputation takes an incisive look at how client reputation monitoring can help bolster web security efforts. Dan argues that as attacks evolve, companies doing business on the web (and who isn't these days)must evolve their strategies for identifying and defending against attacks to be most successful. And a strategy that involves the use of client reputation capabilities to identify bad actors, before they act, is one important strategy to consider.