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Like Skipfish, Vega is Used to Target Financial Sites

Yesterday, we told you about how attackers were exploiting the Skipfish Web application vulnerability scanner to target financial sites. Since then, Akamai's CSIRT team has discovered that another scanner, Vega, is being exploited in the same manner.

Skipfish and Vega are automated web application vulnerability scanners available by free download. Skipfish is available at Google's code website and Vega is available from Subgraph. These are scanners intended for security professionals to evaluate the security profile of their own web sites. Skipfish was built and is maintained by independent developers and not Google. In addition to the code being hosted on Google's downloads site, Google's information security engineering team is mentioned in the Skipfish project's acknowledgements. Vega is a Java application that runs on Linux, OS X and Windows. The most recent release of Skipfish was December 2012 and Vega was August 2013.


Akamai has seen these scanners attacking financial sites looking for Remote File Includes (RFI) with the specific string www.google.com/humans.txt in the requested URL.

CSIRT researchers Patrick Laverty and Larry Cashdollar explained the exploits this way in an advisory available to customers through their services contacts:

Specifically, we have seen an increase in the number of attempts at Remote File Inclusion (RFI). An RFI vulnerability is created when a site accepts a URL from another domain and loads its contents within the site. This can happen when a site owner wants content from one site to be displayed in their own site, but doesn't validate which URL is allowed to load. If a malicious URL can be loaded into a site, an attacker can trick a user into believing they are using a valid and trusted site. The site visitor may then inadvertently give sensitive and personal information to the attacker. For more information on RFI, please see the Web Application Security Consortium and OWASP websites.


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